Frequently Asked Questions

PSAT

SAT

ACT

SAT v ACT

Accommodations

International Students

GRE

Private Tutoring

College Essay Workshops

Essay Class (SAT)

Make Up Classes

National Merit Writing & Language Review (PSAT)

Practice Tests

Registering for official tests

Tutorials


PSAT

Why do students take the PSAT?

The PSAT is worth taking seriously for two main reasons: it constitutes a solid practice round for the SAT, and it qualifies high-scoring juniors for the coveted National Merit Scholarship. Juniors are automatically signed up to take the PSAT/NMSQT through their high school’s counselor. While both sophomores and juniors are eligible to take the PSAT/NMSQT, junior-year PSAT scores will qualify students for any potential National Merit Scholarship. Sophomores can also take the PSAT 10 in the spring of their sophomore year, and freshman are offered the PSAT 8/9 through school. Always check with your counselor to make sure your school offers the PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, or PSAT 8/9 and to see if you are registered for the  appropriate test(s).

How do students register for the official PSAT?

From nationalmerit.org:

“Registration for the test is by high school rather than individual student. Interested students should see their counselor at the beginning of the school year to make arrangements to take the PSAT/NMSQT at the school in October.”

Click here to read more.

What calculators are allowed at the official PSAT/SAT?

To view a complete list of approved calculators for the SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, and PSAT 10, click here.  The new SAT and PSAT each have one “calculator permitted” and one “calculator NOT permitted” section.

When do students take the PSAT?

The PSAT/NMSQT (Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test) is administered by the College Board for high school students once a year during the fall semester, around the second week of October.

The PSAT 8/9 is offered to 8th and 9th graders and the PSAT 10 is offered to sophomores. The PSAT/NMSQT is available to both sophomores and juniors; however, only the junior year PSAT scores count toward National Merit Scholarships.

What is the difference between the PSAT and the SAT?

There are a few important differences between the PSAT and the SAT. The PSAT is the shorter test, completed in 2 hours and 45 minutes. The SAT is completed in 3 hours. The scoring scales differ slightly between both tests, with the PSAT maximum score at 1520 and the SAT maximum score at 1600. Scores from the SAT will be evaluated for college admissions. PSAT scores do not directly influence admission decisions; however, a high enough PSAT score can qualify a student for National Merit Scholarships.

What is a “good” PSAT score?

The qualifying score changes each year because it is based on the top 1% of students who take the test. The maximum score possible on PSAT/NMSQT is 1520. For more information on interpreting a PSAT score, visit our blog! The PSAT is primarily used as a practice test for the SAT. A “good” SAT score differs from university to university. Look up your school(s) of choice online or call the admissions office for insight into competitive scores.

Why shouldn’t PSAT students attend the essay class?

The PSAT does not have an essay portion. Rather, PSAT students should focus on the writing and language section. We welcome all of our PSAT students back to take the essay class when they begin prepping for the SAT!

Who sees the PSAT results?

If a student receives a high score ( top 15%), this score will be released to colleges for consideration.

How do students become eligible for National Merit Scholarship?

The junior year PSAT is the qualifying test for National Merit Scholarships. Semi-finalists are students who score in the top 1% of their region. When the results are announced their senior year, students will be notified through their school counselor if they have been selected as semifinalists. To become finalists, students must complete an application process in the fall of of their senior year. Approximately half of all finalists receive scholarships of some amount.

Click here for more information from the National Merit Scholarship’s website.

What materials do you use?

We provide both our own curriculum and a copy of one of the books below. These materials are included in the cost of the course. The manual we have developed includes test-taking strategies, review of content, and a series of quizzes and homework questions to improve your performance.

For our PSAT and Redesigned SAT classes we use The College Board’s Official SAT Study Guide (Redesigned SAT). Click here to learn more.

For our ACT class we use ACT Inc.’s The Official ACT Prep Guide 2016-2017. Click here to learn more.

 

Can homeschool students take the PSAT?

From nationalmerit.org:

“Yes, but the test must be administered at a local high school or approved location. Contact the principal or guidance counselor well in advance of the test day to make arrangements to take the PSAT/NMSQT at that school.”

Click here to read more.

Who should attend a National Merit Writing & Language Review?

Juniors who have come through our PSAT classroom program and will be taking an official PSAT test in October.

Who should attend an essay class?

Juniors and seniors preparing for the official SAT. There is not an essay portion on the PSAT. Students preparing for the PSAT do not need to take an essay class until they move onto the official SAT.

SAT

What is a “good” SAT score?

The CollegeBoard defines benchmark scores for both the Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing sections of the SAT.  Reaching these benchmarks means that a student has a “75 percent chance of earning at least a C in first-semester, credit-bearing college courses” (CollegeBoard) in related subjects.   The College and Career-Readiness benchmark scores are 530 on the Math section and 480 on the Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section.

Reaching these benchmarks is a good start, however, most competitive schools require significantly higher scores. In general, it’s best to check with each school to which your student is applying to verify its score requirements. Click here to read more!

What calculators are allowed at the official PSAT/SAT?

To view a complete list of approved calculators for the SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, and PSAT 10, click here.  The new SAT and PSAT each have one “calculator permitted” and one “calculator NOT permitted” section.

What is the difference between the PSAT and the SAT?

There are a few important differences between the PSAT and the SAT. The PSAT is the shorter test, completed in 2 hours and 45 minutes. The SAT is completed in 3 hours. The scoring scales differ slightly between both tests, with the PSAT maximum score at 1520 and the SAT maximum score at 1600. Scores from the SAT will be evaluated for college admissions. PSAT scores do not directly influence admission decisions; however, a high enough PSAT score can qualify a student for National Merit Scholarships.

What is a “Super Score?”

Some colleges have begun accepting what is called a “Super Score.” This is a combination of the highest scores from each section of a student’s SAT tests, no matter how many times the student has taken the test

Click here to download a pdf from collegeboard.org about Score Choice and participating institutions.

Will colleges receive my highest test score?

Both the SAT and ACT offer “score choice.” This service makes it possible to select and send the highest overall score from one test sitting (as opposed to super scoring which pulls from multiple sittings). Find out more about score choice at College Board.

If you opt to send “4 scores for free,” schools will receive all scores each time a student tests. If you choose to wait, you may send out your scores once you’ve received them for an additional fee per college.

What materials do you use?

We provide both our own curriculum and a copy of one of the books below. These materials are included in the cost of the course. The manual we have developed includes test-taking strategies, review of content, and a series of quizzes and homework questions to improve your performance.

For our PSAT and Redesigned SAT classes we use The College Board’s Official SAT Study Guide (Redesigned SAT). Click here to learn more.

For our ACT class we use ACT Inc.’s The Official ACT Prep Guide 2016-2017. Click here to learn more.

 

What if a student misses the SAT registration deadline?

If students misses an SAT registration deadline, there is a late registration deadline available for an additional fee. Click here to view all registration deadlines.

Those who miss the late registration deadline can request waitlist testing. To view SAT waitlist requirements and paperwork, click here.

Who should attend an essay class?

Juniors and seniors preparing for the official SAT. There is not an essay portion on the PSAT. Students preparing for the PSAT do not need to take an essay class until they move onto the official SAT.

When do students take the SAT?

We recommend taking the SAT at least twice junior year. Students can take the SAT at any time it is offered, but we recommend taking their first SAT the spring of the junior year. Starting early will ensure that students have ample opportunity to prepare and do their best.

The SAT is offered 7 times a year in: March, May, June, August, October, November, and December.

There is no limit to the number of times a student can take the SAT. Visit www.collegeboard.org to find dates and locations in your area, or to register for the official test

What are the SAT classes like?

Our SAT classroom program typically consists of eight 2-hour classroom sessions or six 3-hour classroom sessions, covering every type of question students will encounter on the test, along with an optional essay workshop for students opting to the test with the essay component. For those who would benefit from additional instruction, free group tutorials are available.

What is an SAT Subject Test?

SAT Subject Tests are 1-hour tests used to determine a student’s mastery of a certain academic subject area.

SAT Subject Tests include: Literature, History, Mathematics, Science, and Foreign Languages.

Who needs to take an SAT Subject Test?

Some schools require these tests as part of the general admissions process. Other schools require them only for certain programs (for example: engineering). Be sure to determine if the schools you are looking at require these tests.

When are SAT Subject Tests given?

SAT subject tests are held on the same Saturday mornings as the SAT reasoning tests. A student may not take both an SAT reasoning test and an SAT subject tests on the same Saturday. However, up to three Subject Tests may be taken on the same Saturday.

What to bring to the SAT test?

 

Test Day Checklist
– Your Admission Ticket
– Photo ID – Click here to view acceptable photo IDs.
– Two no. 2 pencils with soft erasers – Do NOT bring mechanical pencils!
– Calculator – Click here to learn about acceptable and unacceptable calculators.
– Layers – We recommend wearing layers of clothing in case the room gets cold or warm.
– Watch – Make sure your watch does NOT have an audible alarm!
– Snack – There will be a break, so feel free to bring a small snack and some water.

– CD Player – for SAT Subject Tests ONLY

What NOT to Bring
– Cell phones – Click here to learn more about the SAT test Cell Phone Policy
– BlackBerrys
– PDAs
– iPods and iPads
– MP3 players
– Laptops, notebooks, tablets or any other personal computing device
– Pagers
– Timers of any type
– Cameras or other photographic equipment
– Any device capable of recording audio, photographic or video content, or capable of viewing or playing back such content

How do students register for the official SAT?

To register for the SAT visit College Board.

More Than a Teacher cannot register you for the official SAT.

ACT

What is a “good” ACT score?

An average score, nationally and in Texas, is about 21. However, it’s best to check with each school to which your student is applying to verify its score requirements. Please visit the official ACT website to learn more!

Will colleges receive my highest test score?

Both the SAT and ACT offer “score choice.” This service makes it possible to select and send the highest overall score from one test sitting (as opposed to super scoring which pulls from multiple sittings). Find out more about score choice at College Board.

If you opt to send “4 scores for free,” schools will receive all scores each time a student tests. If you choose to wait, you may send out your scores once you’ve received them for an additional fee per college.

What are the ACT classes like?

Our classroom program typically consists of six, 2-hour classroom sessions, which cover all facets of the ACT and include  full-length practice tests produced by the ACT test makers.

When do students take the ACT?

We recommend taking the ACT at least twice. Students can take the ACT at any time, but we recommend taking their first ACT the spring of the junior year. Starting early will ensure students have ample opportunity to prepare and do their best.

The ACT is offered 6 times a year in: Feb., April, June, Sept., Oct., Dec.

There is no limit to the number of times a student can take the ACT. Visit www.act.org for ACT to find dates and locations in your area or sign up for the official test.

What materials do you use?

We provide both our own curriculum and a copy of one of the books below. These materials are included in the cost of the course. The manual we have developed includes test-taking strategies, review of content, and a series of quizzes and homework questions to improve your performance.

For our PSAT and Redesigned SAT classes we use The College Board’s Official SAT Study Guide (Redesigned SAT). Click here to learn more.

For our ACT class we use ACT Inc.’s The Official ACT Prep Guide 2016-2017. Click here to learn more.

 

How do students register for the ACT?

To register for the ACT, visit www.actstudent.org.

More Than a Teacher cannot register you for the official ACT.

What if a student misses the ACT registration deadline?

If you miss your ACT registration deadline, there is a late registration deadline available for an additional fee. Click here to view all registration deadlines.

If you miss the late registration deadline, you can request standby testing. To view ACT standby requirements and paperwork click here.

Why should students take the ACT with the essay?

When registering, students are allowed to choose whether they would like to take the ACT with the essay portion or without. We believe that students should always register for the essay portion. If you apply to a school that requires an essay but you haven’t done an essay, then you will have to retake the WHOLE ACT, not just the essay portion. Similarly, ACT will not “super score” the essay meaning that each time you retake the ACT you will also need to take the essay portion in order to have a score for it.

Click here to read what act.org has to say about the essay.

SAT v ACT

What is the difference between the SAT and ACT?

While the SAT is much more similar to the ACT now than in years past, there are several distinct differences. Take a look at the comparison chart provided below to compare all aspects of the tests. You can also call our office (512-453-7272) to schedule a free consultation with one of our test prep experts to help you determine which test you should target for college admission.

OLD SAT vs NEW SAT vs ACT with conversion

Do colleges require both SAT and ACT for college admission?

No!

Do ALL colleges accept either test?

Yes, but check with your school to make sure they don’t have a preference one way or the other. Most don’t, but it’s always best to check with the school if you are unsure.

Which test should my student take?

Take a practice test! Practice tests will give an accurate assessment of how well your student will perform on a given test. Take advantage of our FREE, complete, proctored practice tests to help determine which test is right for you.

Accommodations

How do I know if my student needs/has accomodations?

coming soon

How do students receive accommodations?

Contact your student’s counselor for help applying for accommodations on the PSAT, SAT, or ACT.

What accommodations do you offer?

Please call our office (512-453-7272) if your student has been granted any testing accommodations by College Board or ACT and you would like to take a practice test. We will do our best to honor the same accommodations.

International Students

Are international students required to take the SAT or ACT?

Certain universities, depending on your intended major, require the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or TOEIC (Test of English for International Communication) in place of, or in addition to, an SAT or ACT. Please check with your prospective universities to find out details.

 

GRE

What is a “good” GRE score?

An average score is about 151 for both Verbal and Math, though the average Math score is slightly higher. It’s best to check with each school to which you are applying to verify its score requirements. Please visit the official ETS website to learn more!

How do students register for the GRE?

To register for the GRE, visit ETS. More Than a Teacher cannot register you for the official GRE.

What materials do you recommend?

For GRE tutoring we use The Official Guide to the GRE revised General Test, written by the people who create the official test.

What if I change my test date or want to test again?

More Than A Teacher understands that life can get in the way. Sometimes a planned test date doesn’t work, you get sick on the day of your test, or you simply didn’t get the score you wanted. Given these realities, any student who takes one of our full courses is welcome to return at any time. As a return student, you may want to simply review the material, or perhaps spend a little more time on that one section you didn’t quite get. Just give us a call if you have already taken one of our courses and want to sit in on another, and we’ll help you find the best schedule we have available. We want to help you get the score you need, even if it takes a little extra time.

What makes your GRE prep better than your competitors’?

The real difference comes down to our teachers. Our teachers are the best in the industry! We don’t just hire people who ace the tests — our teachers are experienced educators skilled at breaking down the material in an accessible way, while still creating an upbeat learning environment. Better teachers mean better results.

What is a typical class size?

2-6

Private Tutoring

Do you offer private tutoring?

In addition to our classroom programs, we offer private tutoring from the same quality teachers who teach our PSAT, SAT, and ACT classes! Visit our private tutoring page for more details on tutoring subjects and rates.

All private tutoring is held at either our Westlake office or North Austin office. We also offer test prep tutoring via skype upon request.

Who can benefit from private tutoring?

Any student struggling or wanting to excel in academics or test prep! We offer a variety of services and discounted test prep tutoring for our classroom students. Call us now for details 512.453.7272

What subjects do your tutors cover?

TEST PREP Tutoring
SAT Full Course:               $1499
SAT Private Tutoring:   $125
per hour for new students, $79 per hour for returning students
ACT Full Course:               $1199 new students,  $711 for returning students
ACT Private Tutoring:  $125 per hour for new students, $79 per hour for returning students
SAT Subject Tests:           $125 per hour for new students, $79 per hour for returning students
GRE:                                            $125 per hour  for new students, $79 per hour for returning students
Duke TIP Program:          $250 for three hours (2 sessions)

ACADEMIC SUBJECTS Tutoring
Higher Level Math or Science:   $79 per hour
— includes all AP Courses, all Physics, Calculus, and PreCalculus, Statistics, Economics
Basic Subjects:                                  $59 per hour
— includes English, History, foreign languages, Algebra I & II, Geometry, Biology, Chemistry, and other lower level non-AP courses.
*Time and a half will be charged for appointments with two students

EXTRAS
College Essay:                   $99 per hour, $79 per hour for returning College Essay Seminar students
College Counseling:       $99 per hour
Study Skills:                       $59 per hour

How do I schedule private tutoring?

Call our office Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm to schedule all private tutoring! 512.453.7272

Do I have to buy a tutoring package?

No!

College Essay Workshops

What is the college essay workshop?

The college essay workshop is one seminar and three one-hour private tutoring sessions to help prepare college entrance essays.

Who should attend a college essay workshop?

Seniors who are ready to work on college entrance essays!

What can I expect from the workshop?

An overview of college entrance essay “dos and don’ts” as well as example essays that have gotten students into University of Texas, Princeton, Wellesley, and more.

What can I expect from the private tutoring sessions?

Personally tailored reviews of the student’s drafts and guidance from instructors who have helped many students through the application process and seen them succeed. After three private tutoring sessions, your student can expect to come away with two polished essays ready to submit to colleges!

Essay Class (SAT)

Why shouldn’t PSAT students attend the essay class?

The PSAT does not have an essay portion. Rather, PSAT students should focus on the writing and language section. We welcome all of our PSAT students back to take the essay class when they begin prepping for the SAT!

Who should attend an essay class?

Juniors and seniors preparing for the official SAT. There is not an essay portion on the PSAT. Students preparing for the PSAT do not need to take an essay class until they move onto the official SAT.

What is covered in the essay class?

A comprehensive overview of what makes a great SAT essay, an in-class essay exercise, and a thoroughly reviewed SAT essay with tips on how to improve your score.

Why isn’t the essay class available during summer sessions?

Summer classes are designed to prepare rising juniors for the PSAT in October. There is no essay on the PSAT, so we wait until after students have taken the PSAT to teach the essay portion of the SAT. Students who take summer classes will be notified when essay classes are available in the fall.

Make Up Classes

Can I make up a class I missed?

Yes! Find a make up class here: http://www.morethanateacher.com/find-a-make-up-class/ You can also give our office a call at (512)453-7272 for more make up class options.

Do I have to register?

As long as a class schedule does not say “limited seating available,” “registration closed,” or “contact office”, you may attend any class as a make up without calling ahead or registering. Please call if you see any of the aforementioned notices. We’re willing to work with you to find a class that works with your schedule!

How many make up classes can I attend?

You may attend as many make up classes as you need! With our returning privileges, you may take and retake as many of our classes as you’d like from various schedules. Please see the note about registering. If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 512.453.7272!

Can I make up a 2 hour class using a 3 hour class?

Yes. If you normally take 2 hour classes, you will see repeated information in our 3 hour classes due to the organization of the classes.

Can I make up a 3 hour class using a 2 hour class?

No. If you normally take 3 hour classes, a 2 hour class will not cover the information needed to fulfill your class schedule. You may, however, take two 2 hour classes to make up one 3 hour class. Call us for details 512.453.7272

National Merit Writing & Language Review (PSAT)

Who shouldn’t attend a National Merit Writing & Language Review?

Students who have not been through our classroom class, and students who have already taken their junior year PSAT.

Who should attend a National Merit Writing & Language Review?

Juniors who have come through our PSAT classroom program and will be taking an official PSAT test in October.

Who qualifies as National Merit finalists?

Since the new PSAT was offered for the first time in October of 2015, there is currently no database of scores. However, historically qualifying scores have been at or near the top 1%. Students who miss more than 10-15 questions on the entire test are unlikely to qualify for scholarships but may still receive recognition.

Practice Tests

Do you proctor PSAT/SAT/ACT practice tests?

Yes! Click here to register for a test!

When is the next practice test?

Click here to find a test that fits your schedule!

Do I have to register for a practice test?

Yes. Click here to register for a practice test.

What should students bring to the practice test?

Students should show up 10 minutes before the test starts with a calculator and sharpened pencils.

Who will see my pratice test grade?

Only you, your parents, and our More Than A Teacher staff will see your practice test grades. Although we use retired PSAT, SAT, and ACTs, we do not release grades to anyone.

How long is the practice test?

PSAT: 2 hours, 45 minutes
The PSAT consists of 4 sections (60, 35, 25, and 45 minutes respectively). You are given a 5-minute break after the 2nd section.

SAT: 3 hours, 50 minutes (3 hours if no essay)
The Redesigned SAT consists of one 50-minute essay and 4 multiple-choice sections (65, 35, 25, and 55 minutes respectively). You are given a 5-minute break after the 2nd section.

ACT: 3 hours, 35 minutes (3 hours if no essay)
The ACT consists of one 40-minute writing section and 4 multiple-choice sections (45, 60, 35, and 35 minutes respectively). You are given a 5-minute break after the 2nd section.

When should students take a practice test?

Now! Practice tests benefit students at every stage of test prep. Take one before you start your class or private tutoring to have a baseline score and something to go over with your tutor. Take one during your class to gauge your improvement and recognize areas that need help. Take one after your class to see how far you’ve come. Sitting in on a proctored practice test also gives students insight into how the official test will feel and offers them an opportunity to overcome testing anxiety. We only require our classroom students to take one test during their class, but we want each student to take advantage of our unlimited practice tests!

When will I know my score?

Students will grade their practice tests immediately after the test. We believe that being aware of how a test is graded is an essential piece of testing strategy.

Registering for official tests

How do students register for the official PSAT?

From nationalmerit.org:

“Registration for the test is by high school rather than individual student. Interested students should see their counselor at the beginning of the school year to make arrangements to take the PSAT/NMSQT at the school in October.”

Click here to read more.

When is the PSAT offered?

The PSAT is offered once a year, around the second week of October. Students should check with their school counselor to make sure they are registered for the PSAT.

How do students register for the official SAT?

To register for the SAT visit College Board.

More Than a Teacher cannot register you for the official SAT.

How do students register for the ACT?

To register for the ACT, visit www.actstudent.org.

More Than a Teacher cannot register you for the official ACT.

When is the next SAT?

The College Board lists official SAT test dates here.

When is the next ACT?

ACT.org lists official ACT test dates here.

Is official test registration included in my More Than A Teacher registration?

No. We are not allowed to register students for official tests.

Can you register me for the test?

No, we are not allowed to register students for official tests.

Tutorials

What are tutorials?

These free sessions are open forum time slots that provide students with the opportunity to ask teachers questions about a practice test or test prep class on a first come, first served basis. Tutorials are a great way to get additional assistance at no extra cost to you! Students should come prepared with questions or materials to review from a practice test or test prep course. We encourage you to take advantage of these free tutorials offered at our Westlake and North offices, as scheduled. Click here to register.

Who can benefit from tutorials?

Any of our students that have taken our test prep classes or a practice test!

When should I attend a tutorial?

Tutorial schedules can be found here. It is most convenient to attend a tutorial immediately following your practice test.

Are tutorials required to complete the course?

No.

Do I need to register for a tutorial?

We encourage students who will be attending our tutorials to register in order for us to have an adequate amount of teachers available to answer your questions. Please click here to register!